Gone Fishin’: National Park Opportunities Await

Fishing in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

For me, summer trips to national parks often involve driving very slowly near streams or rivers. It’s not just to enjoy the scenery—it’s so my husband can peer out to see if there might be a good spot to hop out and cast a fly rod, which could mean extending our trip by minutes or hours depending on the luck he is having that day. Whether it’s Yellowstone’s Madison River or Glacier’s Flathead River, the scenario is always the same.

Although 170 national park sites offer opportunities for recreational fishing, many people may overlook this unique experience. Given the diversity of national park sites and their aquatic environments, these opportunities vary greatly—from ice fishing at Apostle Islands to flats fishing in the Everglades. No matter the location, method, or season, parks provide an impressive backdrop for one of America’s favorite recreational activities.

Because we all rely on America’s Great Waters for countless environmental and economic benefits—just one of which is improved fishing habitat—the National Parks Conservation Association is partnering with the World Fishing Network, the leading entertainment destination and digital resource for anglers throughout North America, in the year-round effort to raise awareness of the need to restore them. The health of America’s national parks is directly linked to the health of the waters that surround and flow through them, and healthy waterways mean healthy and productive fisheries. And when you’re fishing, healthy and abundant fish are exactly what you’re looking for!

With National Fishing and Boating Week upon us, it’s a perfect time to make your plans to get out in our national parks and start practicing your cast. This summer, we want to hear from you about your experiences fishing in our national parks! Share your photos and fish stories by using the hashtag #FishNationalParks on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

About the Author

Director of Conservation Sarah Barmeyer

Sarah Barmeyer is NPCA’s director of conservation and enjoys escaping from her computer to appreciate the best of what America has to offer. See some of her favorite national park photos on her Flickr account at https://flic.kr/ps/22FoeT